Argument preceded Fort Hood shooting - KMSP-TV

Argument preceded Fort Hood shooting

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The welcome sign at Fort Hood's main gate, Fort Hood, Texas. (AP file photo/Tony Gutierrez) The welcome sign at Fort Hood's main gate, Fort Hood, Texas. (AP file photo/Tony Gutierrez)
Spc. Ivan Lopez Spc. Ivan Lopez
 Officials have confirmed that there was a verbal dispute between Specialist Ivan Lopez and members of his unit just before he opened fire.

The Army also says the 34-year-old was on medication for depression, anxiety, and sleep disorders.

Friends claim Lopez was already angry with the military because he wasn't given enough time off for the death of his mother in Puerto Rico last November.

Lopez never saw combat during a deployment to Iraq and had shown no apparent risk of violence before the shooting, officials said.

The 34-year-old truck driver from Puerto Rico seemed to have a clean record that showed no ties to extremist groups. 

Lopez apparently walked into a building Wednesday and began firing a .45-caliber semi-automatic pistol. He then got into a vehicle and continued firing before entering another building. He was eventually confronted by military police in a parking lot, according to Lt. Gen. Mark Milley, senior officer on the base.

As he came within 20 feet of a police officer, the gunman put his hands up but then reached under his jacket and pulled out his gun. The officer drew her own weapon, and the suspect put his gun to his head and pulled the trigger a final time, Milley said.

Lopez grew up in Guayanilla, a town of fewer than 10,000 people on the southwestern coast of Puerto Rico, with a mother who was a nurse at a public clinic and a father who did maintenance for an electric utility company.

Texas governor Rick Perry and Senator Ted Cruz visited survivors of the shooting rampage on Friday.






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