Marijuana study in veterans wins federal backing - KMSP-TV

Marijuana study in veterans wins federal backing

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The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services has given the green light to a study by the University of Arizona that will explore if marijuana can help veterans with PTSD.

However, the study is not starting yet. It still has a hurdle; the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration has to approve the study.

Still, there is major momentum for this study, which could help large numbers of vets struggling with PTSD.

It was a harrowing experience for Ricardo Peryeda.

Pereyda was stationed in Iraq for a year with the U.S. Army Military Police Corps.

He witnessed many hideous scenes but made it through his deployment.

Now he suffers from post traumatic stress disorder.

"there is a pride theme and ego thing I am ok I can handle it suck it up move on and try to live my life a lot more difficult than that," said Ricardo Peryeda.

But marijuana has helped ease his symptoms, Ricardo says.

"There is a hundred scenarios in my head at any time and using cannabis quiets that and allows me to go through my day being productive," he said.

Sue Sisley is a doctor on the faculty of the university of Arizona's medical program in phoenix. She is behind the study to test marijuana's benefits for vets with opts.

"Nobody is arguing whether marijuana is a cure for opts we have never said that we have seen it is an excellent option for symptom control," said Dr. Sue Sisley.

The study is designed for seventy veterans. Dr. Sisley says it will be rigorous, controlled and should take two to three years to complete.

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