Hair regeneration using patient's blood - KMSP-TV

Hair regeneration using patient's blood

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Paul Gioe, 33, said he is self-conscious about a section of thinning hair on the back of his head.

"The past few years I've noticed looking in the mirror, especially looking at old photos, that my hair was thinning and receding," he said. "Looking at my family there are people that don't have any hair and I know how it progressed for them, and in a way I could predict what the future holds for me."

"We can't bring back hairs that are gone, but we can take hairs that are thinning and make them thicker," Dr. Prasad said.

The treatment is unique. Through the use of the patient's own blood, it generates growth of new hair.

"What we're using is a material called extra cellular matrix -- and combining this with platelet rich plasma. Platelet-rich plasma is derived from your own blood," Dr. Prasad said. "We customize the formulation and inject it into the scalp. And what seems to occur is a wound-healing mechanism that results in reversal of hair thinning."

To begin, Dr. Prasad examines Paul's head under a microscope, to figure out where the injections will go. Then Paul gets his blood drawn, and that same blood will be used for about 100 injections all over his scalp.

Dr. Prasad said he has perfected this procedure over the past few years, and the results have been amazing.

"If there is one solution for male pattern hair loss that's almost close to 100 percent in our experience, it's been doing this hair regeneration treatment," Dr. Prasad said.

The one-time treatment costs about $5,000. It is not as effective for men and women with significant hair loss or those who are totally bald.

As for Paul, he should start to see results in about a month. In a year, it will be even better.

"Dr. Prasad was very thorough and clear and made me feel very optimistic about this," he said. "So I'm looking forward to a few months from now."

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