Fork vibrates when you eat too quickly - KMSP-TV

Fork vibrates when you eat too quickly

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NEW YORK (MYFOXNY) -

An electronic fork that vibrates when you eat too quickly has hit the marketplace.

It's called the HAPIfork.

It's makers say it allows the consumer to quickly monitor and reduce the speed at which they eat.

The French inventors hope it can help combat obesity.

HAPIfork records when the user touches the fork to their mouth, and can tell how long the interval is between each fork serving.

If someone is deemed to be eating too fast, HAPIfork alerts them with a gentle vibration and indicator light to remind them to slow down.

Slowing down and paying attention are important steps towards the goal of creating and maintaining healthier and smarter eating habits, according to the people behind the fork.

HAPIfork monitors:

•The number of "fork servings" taken per minute and per meal
•The specific duration of each "fork serving" interval
•The overall meal duration
•The exact start time and end time of the meal

All of the information can then be uploaded and viewed online.  The user can choose to share the information with family and friends.

HAPIfork was awarded the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) 2013 Innovations Award.

The company is trying to raise money via the crowd funding site Kickstarter.  People who pledge $99 to the company get one of the forks.

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