The colors of marketing - KMSP-TV

The colors of marketing

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NEW YORK (MYFOXNY) -

It's something most of us shoppers probably never put much thought into: the white in the Apple logo or the green in the Starbucks sign. But experts say these colors all have meanings designed to lure the customer right in.

From the yellow in the Subway sign to the black and white Raymour and Flannigan logo, when it comes to picking color companies go all out trying to get the customer to come in and spend money.

Ryan Berger and his father Ron are marketing consultants at Berger Shop in the West Village. They say companies often go through a long and very thoughtful process to pick the colors that represent their brand. Most consumers don't even realize it.

"I think it's very subconscious," Ryan Berger says. "I think when they come across and see it, they remember and it pops."

Each color has special meaning. He says green has recently grown thanks to the environmental craze.

"It's very much about earth and nature and green being eco-friendly," he says.

He points out black conveys a sleek and premium feel.

"Black has become the ultimate about style and sophistication and coolness," Berger says.

Orange conjures up feelings of affordability, hence the Payless shoe sign. Berger says yellow is associated with eating, like McDonald's and Subway.

"White has a real freshness, a real calm," he says. "Look at the work Apple has done."

So consumers may unknowingly gravitate toward the color without paying as much attention to the actual product.

"Color masks a lot of things," Berger says. "You may fall in love with the color and not worry about what's under the hood."

Berger points out that pushing the envelope on color today is all about revenue. So for example a sports team that has several jerseys in different colors has a better shot at sales going up.

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