Safety lessons for the subway tracks - KMSP-TV

Safety lessons for the subway tracks

Posted: Updated:
NEW YORK (MYFOXNY) -

The dark underground tunnels of the New York City subway system have been the stuff nightmares for me and probably many who grew up in the city.

It should be.

It's really dangerous on the tracks with 400-ton subway trains barreling underground. And there's that 600-volt third rail that can stop a person's heart instantly if touched and grounded.

On the average, one commuter a week dies on the 625 miles of New York City subway tracks, say transit experts. People fall, jump on the tracks to retrieve property, commit suicide, or are pushed.

Many commuters stay too close to the platform edge some lean out to look for trains. Subway trains, going around 35 to 40 miles per hour, need roughly one football field length to stop once brakes are applied.

The MTA offered reporters a chance to train on track safety on Thursday in a classroom and then walking down the N line tracks in Sunset Park, Brooklyn. The trains were running, but slowed down by transit safety crews with vests lights and radios.

Safety experts say you should never go down onto the tracks unless it is a life and death emergency.

But if you are down there, one way to stay safe is to stand centered in the niches -- those gaps between the support structures parallel to the tracks.

After first looking both ways, since trains are quieter now and in emergencies can come from either direction, we walked down the center of the tracks then the side away from the third rail.

We were told beware the backs of trains since once stopped they can roll backwards. Also, curves can hide a train coming.

  • TrafficMore>>

  • TSA contest calls for ideas to improve airline security lines

    TSA contest calls for ideas to improve airline security lines

    Tuesday, July 29 2014 5:50 PM EDT2014-07-29 21:50:57 GMT
    Everyone hates long lines at security checkpoints and the TSA knows it. Now the TSA is sponsoring a contest to encourage anyone with new ideas about how to make the airport security lines go faster. Often for air travelers, the security checkpoint experience is the worst part of their trip. That's why the TSA turned to the crowdsourcing site Innocentive asking for ideas pledging a total of $15,000 in prize money, with at least one $5,000 award.
    Everyone hates long lines at security checkpoints and the TSA knows it. Now the TSA is sponsoring a contest to encourage anyone with new ideas about how to make the airport security lines go faster. Often for air travelers, the security checkpoint experience is the worst part of their trip. That's why the TSA turned to the crowdsourcing site Innocentive asking for ideas pledging a total of $15,000 in prize money, with at least one $5,000 award.
  • Stuck NJ Transit train removed

    Stuck NJ Transit train removed

    Tuesday, July 29 2014 12:24 PM EDT2014-07-29 16:24:49 GMT
    A New Jersey Transit commuter train with about 1,000 passengers on board became disabled just outside the Hudson River tunnel in Manhattan on Tuesday morning. The train which was on the Northeast Corridor line broke down near 10th Ave., according to NJ Transit officials.  It is not clear what caused the mechanical problem. Lighting and air conditioning on the train were never impacted, according to NJ Transit.
    A New Jersey Transit commuter train with about 1,000 passengers on board became disabled just outside the Hudson River tunnel in Manhattan on Tuesday morning. The train which was on the Northeast Corridor line broke down near 10th Ave., according to NJ Transit officials.  It is not clear what caused the mechanical problem. Lighting and air conditioning on the train were never impacted, according to NJ Transit.
  • Could airlines create a class just for children?

    Could airlines create a class just for children?

    Monday, July 28 2014 12:37 PM EDT2014-07-28 16:37:57 GMT
    Imagine a segregated airline flight: one section for children and one section for adults only. This is the vision of entrepreneur Richard Branson, the president of Virgin Atlantic.
    Imagine a segregated airline flight: one section for children and one section for adults only. This is the vision of entrepreneur Richard Branson, the president of Virgin Atlantic.
  • Local NewsLocal NewsMore>>

  • Aire Ancient Baths

    A relaxing bathhouse in busy Tribeca

    A relaxing bathhouse in busy Tribeca

    Tuesday, July 29 2014 10:29 PM EDT2014-07-30 02:29:51 GMT
    Deep beneath the hustle and bustle of Tribeca lies a modern-day oasis brimming with old world charm: Aire Ancient Baths, my new favorite city escape. The breathtaking spa is illuminated by hundreds of candles and smells of invigorating eucalyptus. For around $80 you can bathe in the tranquil blue pools for 90 minutes and find the temperature that's right for you.
    Deep beneath the hustle and bustle of Tribeca lies a modern-day oasis brimming with old world charm: Aire Ancient Baths, my new favorite city escape. The breathtaking spa is illuminated by hundreds of candles and smells of invigorating eucalyptus. For around $80 you can bathe in the tranquil blue pools for 90 minutes and find the temperature that's right for you.
  • NYC stores with no signs feed curiosity

    NYC stores with no signs feed curiosity

    Tuesday, July 29 2014 8:40 PM EDT2014-07-30 00:40:09 GMT
    From coffee shops in Brooklyn to restaurants in Manhattan, we find speakeasies standing out by blending in. When people in Bushwick want a green machine juice blend they visit Leticia Castillo's Owl Juice Pub. But first they must find the owl. "We been doing fine without a sign," Castillo says.
    From coffee shops in Brooklyn to restaurants in Manhattan, we find speakeasies standing out by blending in. When people in Bushwick want a green machine juice blend they visit Leticia Castillo's Owl Juice Pub. But first they must find the owl. "We been doing fine without a sign," Castillo says.
  • NY brothers invent machine that makes CPR easier

    NY brothers invent machine that makes CPR easier

    Tuesday, July 29 2014 6:40 PM EDT2014-07-29 22:40:57 GMT
    Only 10 percent of people who get CPR from a bystander actually survive. But two young men in Westchester County have now patented a device that could dramatically increase those odds and save lives. John and Chris DiCapua's sitting room in their parents' Westchester County home has had a unique guest lying around for quite a while now: a CPR dummy. What began as an idea from their time as Boy Scouts is now a device that could potentially save lives.
    Only 10 percent of people who get CPR from a bystander actually survive. But two young men in Westchester County have now patented a device that could dramatically increase those odds and save lives. John and Chris DiCapua's sitting room in their parents' Westchester County home has had a unique guest lying around for quite a while now: a CPR dummy. What began as an idea from their time as Boy Scouts is now a device that could potentially save lives.
Powered by WorldNow

KMSP-TV
11358 Viking Drive
Eden Prairie, MN 55344

Phone: (952) 944-9999
Fax: (952) 942-0455

Didn't find what you were looking for?
All content © Copyright 2000 - 2014 Fox Television Stations, Inc. and Worldnow. All Rights Reserved.
Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Ad Choices